≡ Menu

Two important global chemical processes have had meetings recently. Experts working on the Persistent Organic Pollutants Convention recommended international controls on more chemicals, notably the flame retardant deca-DBDE, and the non-stick chemical, PFOA. [read more]

Our food comes into contact with a whole range of food contact materials made from industrial chemicals, from food packaging to pipes. The EU has laws that are supposed to regulate the safety of these chemicals, but they are full of gaps and largely ignore some key issues. A number of events in recent weeks have emphasised the scale of the problem, while the European Parliament has started to investigate the issue. [read more]

In March, the World Health Organisation classified the widely-used herbicide Glyphosate as a probable carcinogen. CHEM Trust has joined with over 45 organisations to send a letter to EU Health Commissioner Vytenis Andriukaitis, urging him to take precautionary action on the use of glyphosate, given these ongoing discussions regarding its carcinogenic properties. [read more]

Highly persistent harmful chemicals are found in marine animals all over the world. These chemicals are having lasting impacts on the health of wildlife, as even if they are banned they stick around. In addition, there’s now a new problem that is concerning scientists: microplastics from cosmetics and other applications  are polluting the environment, and helping to transfer harmful chemicals into marine food chains. [read more]

In recent weeks the International Federation of Gynaecology and Obstetrics has expressed their concerns about the impact of exposure to toxic chemicals on reproduction and development, while scientists from the Endocrine Society have re-affirmed their concerns about endocrine (or hormone) disrupting chemicals (EDCs). Meanwhile, the authors of an important WHO/UNEP report on EDCs have rebutted criticism, while we at CHEM Trust have summarised the current situation for their regulation in the EU. [read more]

New research, published today in the journal Environmental Science & Technology, shows that some persistent perfluorinated chemicals (PFCs) can be transferred from mother to infant via breast milk. These chemicals, which have been widely used, are linked to a number of health problems, including negative impacts on immune response to vaccines in children. The research suggests that breast milk is a major source of exposure to some PFCs during infancy, though the researchers emphasise the important benefits of breast milk for babies. [read more]

A Circular Economy is an important component of a future-focussed, sustainable, economy, and CHEM Trust therefore welcomes the European Commission’s current consultation on the Circular Economy.

We have submitted a briefing to the consultation making recommendations for policies that are needed in order to ensure that the circular economy doesn’t end up perpetuating the use of hazardous chemicals. The aim of Europe’s policies on the circular economy has to be the creation of a clean circular economy, as this is the only truly sustainable approach.

Our key recommendations: [read more]

Perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) have been used in some of our favourite products including waterproof clothing and non stick pans, but their persistence means they’re found all over the globe, in wildlife and in our blood and other tissues. As the amount of research showing the harmful effects of these widely used chemicals grows, many of them are still in use – including in the packaging of microwaveable popcorn. [read more]

Professor Louis Guillette

Professor Louis Guillette, one of the first scientists to study hormone disruption in wildlife, sadly died on 6th August 2015.  His death is a great loss to many, including those of us working to get endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) phased out.

His work was pivotal in showing the effects that EDC chemicals could wreak in wildlife, particularly focussing on alligators.

CHEM Trust Policy Director Gwynne Lyons, said: [read more]

The European Commission is currently investigating the potential impacts of different ways of setting criteria to identify Endocrine (or Hormone) Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs) and has proposed four options. At a recent European Commission conference at the beginning of June the German Risk Assessment Institute (BfR) presented an additional option, which they called ‘option 4b’. CHEM Trust has now analysed this proposal, and finds that it is not a good method to set criteria, from both a scientific and policy point of view. [read more]